Enola Gay: Mission to Hiroshima

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Open Road Media #ad - From diplomatic moves behind the scenes to Japanese actions and the US Army Air Force’s call to action, no detail is left untold. Touching on the early days of the manhattan project and the first inkling of an atomic bomb, investigative journalist Gordon Thomas and his writing partner Max Morgan-Witts, take WWII enthusiasts through the training of the crew of the Enola Gay and the challenges faced by pilot Paul Tibbets.

Painstakingly researched, the story behind the decision to send the Enola Gay to bomb Hiroshima is told through firsthand sources.  . Unrivaled” history of the b-29 and its fateful mission to drop the atomic bomb on Hiroshima The New York Times Book Review. A page-turner that offers “minute-by-minute coverage of the critical periods” surrounding the mission, Enola Gay finally separates myth and reality from the planning of the flight to the moment over Hiroshima when the atomic age was born Library Journal.

Enola Gay: Mission to Hiroshima #ad - From thenew york times–bestselling coauthors: A “fascinating.  .  .

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War's End: An Eyewitness Account of America's Last Atomic Mission

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Skyhorse Publishing #ad - On august 9, 1945, on the tiny island of tinian in the South Pacific, a twenty-five-year-old American Army Air Corps major named Charles W. Sweeney climbed aboard a b-29 superfortress in command of his first combat mission, one devised specifically to bring a long and terrible war to a necessary conclusion .

 .  . Gen. A personal account from the only pilot who was part of both the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombing missions: “A must read for any student of WWII” John McCain. The last military officer to command an atomic mission, Maj. For commemorating a generation of heroes, his book is unforgettable. Dan rather, former cbs evening news anchor   “Chuck Sweeney vividly portrays the dawning of the nuclear age and explains why it was necessary.

War's End: An Eyewitness Account of America's Last Atomic Mission #ad - Dick Cheney. A gripping account of one of history’s greatest events. Stephen E. Ambrose, new york times–bestselling author of Band of Brothers   “Charles Sweeney is the best kind of warrior, motivated by real patriotism. Charles W. Sweeney has the unique distinction of having been an integral part of both the Hiroshima and the Nagasaki bombing runs.

For setting straight a difficult record, his book is invaluable.

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Mayday: Eisenhower, Khrushchev, and the U-2 Affair

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Open Road Media #ad - On may day 1960, soviet forces downed a cIA spy plane flown deep into Soviet territory by Francis Gary Powers two weeks before a crucial summit. From a u-2’s cramped cockpit to tense meetings in the oval office, as well as the recollections of eisenhower’s aides, and letters, which also include Richard Nixon, diaries, the Élysée Palace, historian Michael Beschloss draws on previously unavailable CIA documents, and Number Ten Downing Street, CIA headquarters, to reveal the full high-stakes drama and bring to life its key figures, Allen Dulles, the Kremlin, Camp David, and Charles de Gaulle.

An impressive work of scholarship with the dramatic pacing a spy thriller, Mayday “may be one of the best stories yet written about just how those grand men of diplomacy and intrigue conducted our business” Time. The “definitive” book on the U-2 episode and its disastrous impact on the future of the Cold War Kirkus Reviews.

Mayday: Eisenhower, Khrushchev, and the U-2 Affair #ad -  . In rich and fascinating detail, ” the us government’s misconceived attempt to cover up the true purpose of the flight, Khrushchev’s dramatic revelation that Powers was alive and in Soviet custody, Mayday explores the years of U-2 flights, which Eisenhower deemed “an act of war, and the show trial that sentenced the pilot to prison and hard labor.

This forced president dwight eisenhower to decide whether, to admit to Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev—and the world—that he had secretly ordered Powers’s flight, in an effort to save the meeting, or to claim that the CIA could take such a significant step without his approval.

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Shipwreck: The Strange Fate of the Morro Castle

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Open Road Media #ad - Against the backdrop of the great depression and the buildup of World War II, tragedy, Shipwreck is a sweeping tale of personal heroism, and murder. This edgar award finalist by two new york times–bestselling authors provides an “exciting” account of the devastating and mysterious cruise ship fire The Washington Post.

His name: george White Rogers, chief radio officer. In the early morning hours of september 8, the luxury cruise liner Morro Castle, carrying 316 passengers and 230 officers and crew, 1934, caught fire a few hours out of the New York harbor on a return voyage from Havana. They also prove that rogers was responsible for the death of the captain, who was poisoned several hours before the fire broke out.

Shipwreck: The Strange Fate of the Morro Castle #ad - Shipwreck is a spellbinding moment-by-moment account of the Morro Castle’s last voyage, and one of the most spectacular disasters to stir the Atlantic Ocean. The fire spread with terrifying swiftness, transforming the ship into a blazing inferno. Through interviews with survivors, rescuers, and investigators, the authors detail a desperate investigation and the search for a mass murderer.

One hundred thirty-four people died that night—was it an accident?   Writers Gordon Thomas and Max Morgan Witts prove that the disaster was no accident, meticulously and deliberately, but was planned, by an officer of the Morro Castle.

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Those Who Hold Bastogne: The True Story of the Soldiers and Civilians Who Fought in the Biggest Battle of the Bulge

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Yale University Press #ad - A fast-paced story .  .  . The first thorough treatment of the famous battle for Bastogne. John C. Mcmanus, author of Fire and Fortitude. The plan nearly succeeded, and almost certainly would have, were it not for one small Belgian town and its tenacious American defenders who held back a tenfold larger German force while awaiting the arrival of Gen.

Hitler’s last gamble, the battle of the Bulge, was intended to push the Allied invaders of Normandy all the way back to the beaches. The costs of war are revealed, uncovered in the stories of those who perished and those who emerged from battle to find the world forever changed. Schrijvers does an admirable job of weaving personal accounts into the larger picture of Bastogne’s horrors.

Those Who Hold Bastogne: The True Story of the Soldiers and Civilians Who Fought in the Biggest Battle of the Bulge #ad - The wall street journal   “Pulse-pounding .  .  . From the december stampede of american and panzer divisions racing to reach Bastogne first, and through three more weeks of unrelenting fighting even after the siege was broken, through the bloody eight-day siege from land and air, events at Bastogne hastened the long-awaited end of WWII.

The acclaimed world war ii historian delivers “a panoramic and compelling boots-on-the-ground illumination of one of the Bulge’s most epic battles” Patrick K. O’donnell, author of Washington’s Immortals. In this dramatic account of the 1944–45 winter of war in Bastogne, historian Peter Schrijvers offers the first full story of the German assault on the strategically located town.

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The Dawn's Early Light: The War of 1812 and the Battle That Inspired Francis Scott Key to Write "The Star-Spangled Banner"

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Open Road Media #ad - At the dawn of the nineteenth century, the great powers of Western Europe treated the United States like a disobedient child. America’s complaints were ignored, the country’s fourth president, and the humiliation continued until James Madison, declared a second war on Great Britain. With stunning detail on land and naval battles, and the larger backdrop of the napoleonic wars, this is the story of the turning points of this strange conflict, the role Native Americans played in the hostilities, which inspired Francis Scott Key to write “The Star-Spangled Banner” and led to the Era of Good Feelings that all but erased partisan politics in America for almost a decade.

By the author of a night to remember, the classic account of the sinking of the titanic—which was not only made into a 1958 movie but also led director James Cameron to use Lord as a consultant on his epic 1997 film—as well as acclaimed volumes on Pearl Harbor Day of Infamy and the Battle of Midway Incredible Victory, this is a fascinating look at an oft-forgotten chapter in American history.

The Dawn's Early Light: The War of 1812 and the Battle That Inspired Francis Scott Key to Write "The Star-Spangled Banner" #ad - British forces would descend on the young United States, shattering its armies and burning its capital, but America rallied, and survived the conflict with its sovereignty intact. It was in 1812 that america found its identity and first assumed its place on the world stage. Great britain blocked american trade, seized its vessels, and impressed its sailors to serve in the Royal Navy.

A riveting account of america’s second war with England, from the #1 New York Times–bestselling author of The Miracle of Dunkirk.

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Codebreakers' Victory: How the Allied Cryptographers Won World War II

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Open Road Media #ad - Haufler pulls together years of research, exclusive access to top secret files, and personal interviews to craft a captivating must-read for anyone interested in the behind-the-front intellect and perseverance that went into beating the Nazis and Japan. From the battle of britain to the Pacific front to the panzer divisions in Africa, superior cryptography gave the Allies a decisive advantage over the Axis generals.

It was a role key to the Allied victory. Now, after decades have passed, though, the true scope of the British and American cryptographers’ role in the war has come to light. This broad view represents the first comprehensive account of codebreaking during World War II. Military intelligence made a significant difference in battle after battle.

Codebreakers' Victory: How the Allied Cryptographers Won World War II #ad - Even winston churchill, himself a great advocate of Britain’s cryptologic program, purposefully minimized their achievements in his history books. In codebreakers’ victory, veteran cryptographer Hervie Haufler takes readers behind the scenes in this fascinating underground world of ciphers and decoders.

With exclusive interviews, a signal Corps veteran tells the full story of how cryptography helped defeat the Axis powers, at Bletchley Park and beyond. For years, the story of the World War II codebreakers was kept a crucial state secret.

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The San Francisco Earthquake: A Minute-by-Minute Account of the 1906 Disaster

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Open Road Media #ad - From the authors of the day the bubble burst, the San Francisco Earthquake is an important look at how the city has handled catastrophe in the past—and how it may handle it in the future. It also features personal stories of people who experienced it firsthand, the temperamental star John Barrymore, the banker Amadeo Giannini, the writer-adventurer Jack London, including the great Italian tenor Enrico Caruso, and the thousands of less famous in their struggle for survival.

It happened at 5:13 a. M. To this day, it remains one of the worst natural disasters in American history—and this definitive book brings the full story to vivid life. A “gripping, can’t-put-it-down” chronicle, drawing on eyewitness reports and historical documents, by the New York Times–bestselling authors of Enola Gay Los Angeles Herald Examiner.

The San Francisco Earthquake: A Minute-by-Minute Account of the 1906 Disaster #ad - Using previously unpublished documents from insurance companies, and the red cross, the military, as well as the stories of those who were there, The San Francisco Earthquake exposes villains and heroes; shows how the political powers tried to conceal the amount of damage caused by the earthquake; reveals how efforts to contain the fire actually spread it instead; and tells how the military executed people without trial.

On april 18, 1906, in San Francisco.

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B-29 Superfortress Annotated: The Plane that Won the War

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The War Vault #ad - B-29 superfortress: the plane that won the War is the definitive account of the crucial role played by the B-29 bomber during World War II. Author gene gurney takes the reader from the superplane’s inception, test flights and production to its combat deployments and its ultimate purpose of dropping the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

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Racing for the Bomb: The True Story of General Leslie R. Groves, the Man behind the Birth of the Atomic Age

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Skyhorse Publishing #ad - Norris brings essential clarity to this overlooked figure. Leslie R. In norris’s lively, richly detailed biography, General Leslie R. Roosevelt to direct the top-secret research project. The untold story of the career officer in the Army Corps of Engineers who oversaw the Manhattan Project and the creation of the atomic bomb.

He drove the manufacturers, industrialists, the materials, construction crews, scientists, and civilian officials to produce the money, and the plans to build the bomb in only two years. In racing for the Bomb, historian Robert S. Norris offers new insights into the complex and controversial questions surrounding those decisions, as well as Groves’s actions during World War II, which had a lasting imprint on the Cold War and the nuclear age.

Groves finally emerges as the historic, tough, larger-than-life leader who made the atomic bomb happen. Richard rhodes, author of the making of the Atomic Bomb   “Norris’s narrative is of much use to students of the atomic age. Kirkus Reviews. As revealed here for the first time, timing, Groves also played a decisive role in the planning, and targeting of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

Racing for the Bomb: The True Story of General Leslie R. Groves, the Man behind the Birth of the Atomic Age #ad - The manhattan project was the most secretive government project the United States had ever undertaken, and would prove to be one of the most consequential in history. Groves. As one of the head engineers who oversaw the construction of the Pentagon, Groves had proven his skill at marshaling vast resources and conflicting personalities, as well as his ability to handle highly sensitive matters.

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Pearl Harbor: Final Judgement: The Shocking True Story of the Military Intelligence Failure at Pearl Harbor and the Fourteen Men Responsible for the Disaster

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Open Road Media #ad - On december 6, 1941, Admiral Husband E. Over the course of ten months, from November 1944 to September 1945, Clausen led an exhaustive investigation. Kimmel, commander in chief of the United States Pacific Fleet, assured his staff that the Japanese would not attack Pearl Harbor. Clausen left no stone unturned in his dogged effort to determine who was truly responsible for the disaster at Pearl Harbor.

. The next morning, japanese carriers steamed toward Hawaii to launch one of the most devastating surprise attacks in the history of war, proving the admiral disastrously wrong. Secretary of War Henry L. The results of the initial investigation failed to implicate who was responsible for this intelligence debacle.

Pearl Harbor: Final Judgement: The Shocking True Story of the Military Intelligence Failure at Pearl Harbor and the Fourteen Men Responsible for the Disaster #ad - Clausen. The authoritative appraisal of why American armed forces met the Japanese attack asleep” The Christian Science Monitor. Pearl harbor: final judgement reveals all of the eye-opening details of Clausen’s investigation and is a damning account of massive intelligence failure. Stimson, realizing that high-ranking members of the military had provided false testimony, decided to reopen the investigation by bringing in an unknown major by the name of Henry C.

He logged more than fifty-five thousand miles and interviewed over one hundred military and civilian personnel, ultimately producing an eight-hundred-page report that brought new evidence to light. This account of the top secret investigation is “essential history.

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